The Height of Narcissism

Since the beginning of time, one religious leader or another has been predicting the “end of days” or the end of times. Despite thousands of predictions by thousands of prophets/ leaders, if you’re reading this, we’re still here.

One widely publicized revelation by a California prophet/radio show host that affected hundreds of believers, had “the rapture” set for May 21, 2011. The “seer”, Harold Camping, later revised his calculation, which, by the way, was a revision of a previous non-rapture. Camping’s personal rapture came two years later on December 15, 2013. He “entered the portal” alone.

How do these “prophets” get followers? How do they convince their followers to sell all of their belongings, tell their extended families goodbye and then wait patiently for the end?

Once thrown by the horse of sophism, why do these duped followers climb back on the horse again?

Try to get inside the mind of someone who believes that their higher power specifically waited for them to be born so that the higher power could then end the world for everyone. Think of the greats that have gone before, DaVinci, Einstein, Ghandhi, et al., and yet, for some reason, the timing was not right until that specific believer got here. To me, this is the height of narcissism.

This narcissistic world-view pervades everything for these followers of the “end of times” philosophy. Fortunately, the founding fathers of the United States left us with a document that draws a line strongly between church and state, between faith and government policy, between “I believe” and fact. Unfortunately, that line gets crossed way too much. Particularly of late.

During the 1980’s, James G. Watt was the United States Secretary of Interior to Ronald Reagan. While testifying before Congress, Watt said, “I do not know how many future generations we can count on before the Lord returns, whatever it is we have to manage with a skill to leave the resources needed for future generations.” While he was speaking of a time of “future generations” he was also suggesting that all 80 million acres of undeveloped land in the United States be opened for drilling and mining. Sound familiar?

As a Pentecostal, Mr. Watt was a believer in the rapture. If one believes in the scripture that “no one knows the day or hour”, then one could believe the rapture would be in their time. Logically, if the righteous are all about to be called up to heaven, why not leave behind a world stripped of all of its resources?

I for one don’t believe the Donald has one religious bone in his body. He worships the dollar and what it will buy, particularly the power. The fact that the Donald doesn’t believe doesn’t mean he is above manipulating those that do. In fact, they’re his meat. If he can whip his cult into a frenzy he will say anything, deliver any cockamamie theory, tell any lie to stir up his minions.

Now the election is over; more than half of the voters have demanded with their vote that the time for lunacy needs to come to an end. Nearly 80 million people voted in life threatening circumstances for a return to sanity, a return to decency, a return to rules and laws being followed and enforced.

The “prophet” Donald Trump, without benefit of medical degree, or probably any degree, has been demanding that his cult ignore sound medical advice in order to keep the DOW averages up.

“I just need you to drink this cup of Koolaid so my Kraft Heinz stock stays healthy.”

The majority of voters have demanded an end to the temper tantrums thrown by the cult leader that has resulted in the deaths of at least a quarter million of American lives. Some of these voters will have undoubtedly given their life by insisting that their voice be heard.

Believing that he alone can fix it has allowed the Donald to shout down, fire, harass and threaten the experts while he exhorts his followers to follow him into the emergency room carrying the deadly disease.

Is this obtuseness a campaign to infect us all a part of his “final solution” or just the height of narcissism?

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